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IPF Staff & Colleagues

7 December 2007

IPF advisory board, staff, trainers, and associates

Advisory Board
Aryeh Neier (President, Open Society Institute; IPF Founder)
Leonard Benardo (Open Society Institute, New York)
Aleksander Smolar (Stefan Batory Foundation, Warsaw)
Vita Terauda (Centre for Public Policy PROVIDUS, Riga)
Violetta Zentai (Center for Policy Studies, Budapest)

Staff and Trainers
Krisztina Bakos (program coordinator)
Anita Karpati (coordinator)
Pamela Kilpadi (founding director)
Merrill Oates (information technology trainer)
Leslie A. Pal (senior associate)
Lisa Quinn (policy trainer)
Olena Sydorenko-Szabo (policy officer)
Eoin Young (policy trainer)

Associates
Andrew Cartwright (CPS Research Fellow; IPF Policy Perspectives Contributing Editor)
Alan C. Doig (IPF Group Advisor, Democratic Governance, Transparency and Accountability)
Dale Eickelman (IPF Individual Advisor, Wider Europe)
Leslie C. Eliason in memoriam (Senior Associate)
Michael Emerson (IPF Group Advisor, The Challenge of Wider Europe)
Helen Epstein (IPF Group Advisor, Public Health and the Roma)
Nüket Kardam (IPF Trainer and Consultant)
Liisi Keedus (IPF Alumnus and Consultant)
Pamela Kilpadi (IPF Founding Director)
Stephen Kotkin (IPF Group Advisor, Combating Open Society Threats)
Lawrence Liang (IPF Group Advisor, Open Information Policy)
Daniel Pop (CPS Research Associate)
Michael Ross (IPF Group Advisor, Combating the Resource Curse)
Barnett Rubin (IPF Individual Advisor, Open Society Promotion in Predominantly Muslim Societies)
Olivier De Schutter (IPF Group Advisor, Roma Exclusion)
Diane Lesley Stone (Founding Head of the CEU Masters of Arts in Public Policy Program)
Kian Tajbakhsh (IPF Group Advisor, Open Society Promotion in Predominantly Muslim Societies)
Dmitri Vitaliev (IPF Trainer and Consultant)
Vadim Volkov (IPF Group Advisor, Combating Open Society Threats; Developing Socially Responsible Elites and the Challenges of Higher Education)

Colleague Bios

Krisztina Bakos (IPF Program Coordinator) specializes in health issues and joined the International Policy Fellowships program in 2003 as a coordinator of fellowships for the Open Society Institute Public Health Programs. She became IPF's program coordinator in 2004. She has more than a decade of work experience organizing complex programs for international educational, legal, cultural and film-making institutions. Kriszta earned an MA from ELTE University Budapest.

Leonard Benardo (IPF Advisory Board) is the Open Society Institute's Regional Director for Russia, Ukraine, the Baltics, Poland and Hungary. He has worked with the Foundation since 1996. In addition to his OSI activities, Leonard moonlights as a tour guide and writer on urban-related concerns. He earned advanced degrees from Columbia University and the University of Michigan.

Andrew Cartwright (CPS Research Fellow; IPF Policy Perspectives Contributing Editor) came to the Center for Policy Studies from the Center for Central and Eastern Studies, University of Liverpool, UK. He teaches rural development policy and his research interests are in property relations and their role in post-socialist economic development. Andrew serves as an editor for the CPS Policy Documentation Center. He earned a PhD, LLM, and LLB from the University of Warwick.

Alan C. Doig (IPF 2005-6 Group Advisor, Democratic Governance, Transparency and Accountability) is Professor of Public Services Management, and Head of the Fraud Managment Studies Unit, at Teesside Business School, University of Teesside, UK. His areas of teaching and research are public services management, the impact of change on governance and fraud management, and operational and organizational issues related to the prevention, detection and investigation of fraud and corruption. He has served as a consultant for international organizations working on evaluation and anti-corruption projects in numerous countries. In 2002 he was project director for the review and implementation of the National Anti-Corruption Programme for the government of Lithuania. He holds several public appointments in England including Board member for the Standards Board of England and Vice-Chair, North East Fraud Forum. His authored and edited books include Corruption and Misconduct in Contemporary British Politics, Corruption and Democratisation, and Sleaze: Politics, Private Interests and Public Reaction; he is completing books on fraud and state crime. Since 1999 he has been project leader for some 30 country studies in developed, developing and transitional countries on corruption and the National Integrity System. He earned an MA from the University of Durham.

Dale Eickelman (IPF 2005-6 Individual Advisor, Wider Europe) is Ralph and Richard Lazarus Professor of Anthropology and Human Relations at Dartmouth College. He has been conducting ethnographic field research in the Middle East, particularly North Africa and the Arabian Peninsula, since 1968. His research focuses on the relation between religion and politics in the Muslim world; the role of intellectuals in society, education, media, and communications; and ideas of knowledge. His widely translated books include Moroccan Islam (University of Texas Press, 1976), The Middle East and Central Asia: An Anthropological Approach, 4th ed. (Prentice Hall, 2002), Knowledge and Power in Morocco (Princeton University Press, 1985), and Muslim Politics (co-author; Princeton University Press, 1996), as well as edited books including New Media in the Muslim World: The Emerging Public Sphere (Indiana University Press, 1999 [co-edited with Jon W. Anderson; 2nd edition in press]; Russia's Muslim Frontiers: New Directions in Cross-Cultural Analysis (Indiana University Press, 1993); and Muslim Travellers: Pilgrimage, Migration and the Religious Imagination (co-edited with James Piscatori; University of California Press, 1990). The former president of the Middle East Studies Association of North America and a member of the International Advisory Board of the International Institute for the Study of Islam in the Modern World, Leiden, in summer 2002 he completed a two-year Euro-American postdoctoral field-building project funded by the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation (Germany), called "Public Spheres and Muslim Identities." As a result of the project he is currently working on a co-edited book "Public Islam and the Common Good." He earned a PhD from the University of Chicago.

Leslie C. Eliason in memoriam (IPF Trainer), who tragically passed away at the age of 44 in 2004 during her tenure as a CEU Visiting Fellow at CPS, was Associate Professor at the Graduate School of International Policy Studies, Monterey Institute of International Studies. An annual IPF fellowship award was established in her honor. Leslie's main areas of expertise were comparative public policy, European politics, research methods, and cross-cultural policy studies. Her international experience included field research in Denmark, Sweden, and Germany along with a Fulbright visiting lectureship at the Institute of Political Science at the University of Aarhus, Denmark. She has lectured at the University of Gdansk, Poland, and consulted on a USAID project in Romania. She taught at the University of Washington and headed the international specialization in the Graduate School of Public Affairs. Leslie served as campus coordinator for the Hubert H. Humphrey Fellowship program, bringing mid-career professionals to the United States for academic and professional development, and ran a summer program for visiting Japanese public managers. She has published articles and book chapters on Scandinavian politics, German and Swedish reforms in education and health care policy, welfare state development, and administrative reform in Central and Eastern Europe. She earned a PhD and MA from Stanford University.

Michael Emerson (IPF Group Advisor, The Challenge of Wider Europe) is Senior Research Fellow at the Centre for European Policy Studies (CEPS) in Brussels. He served as European Union Ambassador to Moscow from 1991 to 1996. His primary research interests focus on pan-European institutions, political economy of Wider Europe, European security policy, and EU relations with Russia, Ukraine and the Northern Dimension, Turkey, and Cyprus, while his secondary areas of research expertise include the economics of transition to a market economy, EU politics, enlargement of the EU, European Monetary Union, democratization in South Eastern Europe, EU relations with the Caucasus, and EU-US relations. He earned an MA from the University of Oxford and honorary doctorates from Kent University and Keele University.

Helen Epstein (IPF 2005-6 Group Advisor, Public Health and the Roma) is a visiting scholar at the Center for Health and Wellbeing at Princeton University in the US. She has written extensively about public health issues in developing countries and is currently working on a book about AIDS in Africa. Her public health-related articles have been published in both academic journals and popular magazines such as The New York Review of Books, The New York Times Magazine, and Granta. Helen earned a PhD from Cambridge University, UK, and MSc from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. 

Nüket Kardam (IPF Trainer and Consultant) is an associate professor at the Graduate School of International Policy Studies, Monterey Institute of International Studies and spends part of each year in her native country, Turkey. Her main areas of expertise are gender and development, development theory and practice, international organizations, Turkey and Central Asia, and she has conducted research on organizational change in donor agencies, improving accountability in development organizations, and problems of collaboration between donors and recipients. At the national and regional levels, she has advised the United Nations Development Program on gender mainstreaming strategies, gender and good governance programs and provided a training program at OECD on the same topics. Nüket has recently worked in Azerbaijan, Uzbekistan and Turkmenistan. Her forthcoming book focuses on Turkey's engagement in global women's human rights issues and she is author of the book Bringing Women In: Women's Issues in International Development Programs. She earned a PhD from Michigan State University and MA from the University of British Columbia. 

Anita Kárpáti (IPF Program Coordinator) joined the Open Society Institute in 2000 as a consultant working for the Local Government Initiatives and Reform Program (LGI). She has been a staff member of the International Policy Fellowships program since 2003. In conjunction with her OSI work, she is student at the National Communications Studies program, Communication School of Budapest. Ms. Kárpáti earned a certificate as a specialist in diplomatic protocol.

Liisi Keedus (IPF Alumnus and Consultant) is a PhD candidate at Tallinn University and edits IPF's online fellow research database. During her 2002-2003 IPF fellowship year she conducted the policy research project "Media and Ethnic Integration Policies in Estonia" and served as a visiting lecturer of contemporary political philosophy at the Estonian Art Academy and Nord University in Tallinn. She has worked as a consultant on a number of integration promotion film projects with the film company F-Seitse. She earned an MA from the Central European University.

Pamela Kilpadi (IPF Founding Director) was appointed to run the International Policy Fellowships program when it was launched in 1998. She is a board member of several policy institutes established by IPF fellows. Pamela is currently a postgraduate with the University of Bristol School for Policy Studies in the UK, working on policy research projects focusing on South Asia. She joined the Open Society Institute in 1994 as a research associate and later Assistant Director of the Forced Migration Projects in New York, where she researched and wrote articles for OSI publications and academic journals on forced migration in the former Soviet Union, and in 1996 established the Projects' Budapest office. From 1989 she published hundreds of articles as a journalist in Boston and an editor and writer in Moscow including features on Russia's political and social transformation in English and Russian. Pamela earned a dual degree MA from the Columbia University School of International and Public Affairs and graduate certificate from the Harriman Institute, Columbia University.

Stephen Kotkin (IPF Group Advisor, Combating Open Society Threats) is Professor of European and Asian history at Princeton University, where he also directs the Russian Studies Program. He serves on the Editorial Board and Trustees of Princeton University Press and on the Executive Committee of the Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies (PIIRS). Outside Princeton, he serves on the Social Science Research Council (SSRC) Advisory Committee and as a consultant to a number of foundations. He has authored, co-authored, or edited nine books, including Magnetic Mountain (1995), Armageddon Averted (2001), and Political Corruption in Transition: A Handbook (2002). He has been a visiting professor in Russia and Japan, and is the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship. He writes reviews and essays for The New Yorker, The New York Review of Books, The New York Times, Financial Times, The New Republic, and the TLS. He is also a commentator on the BBC and National Public Radio (NPR). His recent project entitled "Lost in Siberia: Dreamworlds of Eurasia" is a study of the Ob River basin over the last seven centuries. He earned a PhD and MA from the University of California at Berkeley.

Lawrence Liang (IPF Group Advisor, Open Information Policy) is a cofounder of the Alternative Law Forum (ALF), a collective of lawyers based in India working on various aspects of law, legality and power. His key areas of interest are law, technology and culture, and the politics of copyright. He has works closely with Sarai in New Delhi on the joint research project "Intellectual Property and the Knowledge/Culture Commons." A keen follower of the Free Software movement, Lawrence has been working on ways of translating  open source ideas into the cultural domain. He has published extensively in various journals and is the author of Guide to Open Content Licenses and The Public is Watching: A Historical Reconstruction of Film Censorship in India. A graduate of the National Law School in Bangalore, he subsequently earned his MA from Warwick on a Chevening Scholarship.

Aryeh Neier (OSI President, IPF Advisory Board). Prior to joining the Open Society Institute in 1993, Aryeh Neier served for 12 years as Executive Director of Human Rights Watch. Before that, he spent 15 years at the American Civil Liberties Union, including eight years as national Executive Director. Mr. Neier has served as an Adjunct Professor of Law at New York University for more than a dozen years. He is a frequent contributor to The Nation and The New York Review of Books, and has published in periodicals such as The New York Times Magazine, The New York Times Book Review, and Foreign Policy. Mr. Neier has contributed more than a hundred op-ed articles in newspapers including The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Boston Globe, and The International Herald Tribune. Author of six books, Mr. Neier has also contributed chapters to more than twenty books. He has lectured at most of the country's leading universities, and has appeared frequently on such television shows as "Nightline," the "Mc-Neil-Lehrer Newshour," and the "Today Show." Mr. Neier, a naturalized American, was born in Nazi Germany and became a refugee at an early age. He is the recipient of six honorary doctorates and the American Bar Association's Gavel Award.

Merrill Oates (IPF Technology and Training Consultant) has been affiliated with the Soros foundations network since 1992. As a PhD candidate at the University of Pennsylvania he was selected by the Civic Education Project to serve as a lecturer of anthropology and sociology at Zaporozhye State University in Ukraine, where he established the Center for Social and Economic Research. Since 1994 he has worked for the Central European University and Open Society Institute in Budapest for various education outreach programs and joined IPF soon after its establishment in 1998. More recently, his interests have turned to the social and practical applications of new information and communication technologies in education, the nonprofit sector, and business communications in Central and Eastern Europe (CEE). Merrill specializes in online learning and mobile communication technologies and has served as a trainer and consultant throughout the CEE region via the Budapest-based IT company he established, including as an online learning trainer for the CEENet association and most recently for Masaryk University in Brno, Czech Republic. He earned a post-graduate certificate in the Applications of Information Technology in Open and Distance Learning from the Open University, UK.
 

Leslie A. Pal (IPF Senior Associate and 2005-6 Group Advisor, Policymaking in Transition Contexts) is Professor of Public Policy and Administration and Director of the School of Policy and Administration at Carleton University. He is the author, co-author or editor of over twenty books, the most recent being the third edition of Beyond Policy Analysis: Public Issue Management in Turbulent Times (Thomson Nelson, 2005) and The Government Taketh Away: The Politics of Pain in the United States and Canada (co-edited with R. Kent Weaver, Georgetown University Press, 2003). Les has also published over fifty articles and book chapters in a wide variety of areas, including Canadian politics, public policy and administration, information technology, European integration, and international human rights. He taught for two years at the University of Waterloo and for ten years at the University of Calgary before taking up his current position at Carleton University in 1992. He earned a PhD and MA from Queen's University, Canada.

Daniel Pop (CPS Research Associate) is Executive Director of the Public Policy Center in Cluj, Romania, and an associate lecturer at Babes Bolyai University in Cluj. He recently interviewed dozens of IPF alumni, advisors and colleagues for an IPF impact assessment commissioned by the Global Development Network, a world-wide association of research institutes concerned with issues of development and transition. Daniel has worked for a number of non-governmental organizations and published articles on development issues. His edited volume New Patterns of Labour Migration in Central and Eastern Europe was published in 2004 by the Open Society Foundation's East East Program. Daniel earned an MA from the University of Denver and is a PhD candidate at the Central European University.

Lisa Quinn and Eóin Young (IPF Policy Trainers) are Applied Linguists who have been working as skills trainers in the region of Central and Eastern Europe through the Open Society Institute and Central European University for the past 10 years. Since January 2002, Eóin and Lisa have worked directly with the Local Government and Public Service Reform Initiative (LGI) and the International Policy Fellowship (IPF) in the design, development and delivery of various training modules focused on policy communication. Their current training modules focus on building skills in writing effective policy papers to influence decision-making, producing policy-relevant analysis and writing, and developing effective advocacy strategies for policy change. These modules have been delivered to a wide variety of policy actors throughout the region of CEE, former Soviet Union, Central Asia and Mongolia and have become integral training elements for many policy fellowship programs (e.g. IPF, LGI). Eóin and Lisa authored the LGI guidebook Writing effective public policy papers: A guide for policy advisers in Central and Eastern Europe (2002, LGI/OSI), which has been translated into Bulgarian, Mongolian, Russian, Ukrainian and Serbian with current plans for translation also into Albanian and Bosnian. Eóin and Lisa have also developed and implemented a comprehensive Training of Trainers program in Mongolia, Bulgaria and Serbia to support the sustainable dissemination of policy writing skills in regional languages.

Michael Ross (IPF Group Advisor, Combating the Resource Curse) is Associate Professor of Political Science and Chairman of the International Development Studies program at the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA). His research deals with political economy, democratization, natural resources, and poverty in the developing world, particularly (but not exclusively) in Southeast Asia. Michael's main project at the moment is a book on the "resource curse" explaining why countries with lots of natural resource wealth tend to do worse than countries with less resource wealth. He is the author of Timber Booms and Institutional Breakdown in Southeast Asia (Cambridge University Press, 2001) and numerous book chapters and articles. From 1996 to 2001 he was Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.  In 2000 he served as a Visiting Scholar at the World Bank in Washington, D.C., and Jakarta, Indonesia. He earned his PhD from Princeton University.

Barnett Rubin (IPF 2005-6 Individual Advisor, Open Society Promotion in Predominantly Muslim Societies) is Director of Studies and Senior Fellow at the Center for International Cooperation, New York University. In November-December 2001 he served as special advisor to the UN Special Representative of the Secretary General for Afghanistan, Lakhdar Brahimi, during the negotiations that produced the Bonn Agreement. During 1994-2000 he was Director of the Center for Preventive Action, and Director, Peace and Conflict Studies, at the Council on Foreign Relations in New York. He is considered one of the world's foremost experts on Afghanistan and the surrounding region, as well as on conflict prevention and peace building. Dr. Rubin was Associate Professor of Political Science and Director of the Center for the Study of Central Asia at Columbia University from 1990 to 1996. Previously, he was a Jennings Randolph Peace Fellow at the United States Institute of Peace and Assistant Professor of Political Science at Yale University. He received a Fulbright Fellowship to study at the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales in Paris in 1977-1978. He is currently deputy chair of the Conflict Prevention and Peace Forum, a member the Steering Committee of Human Rights Watch/Europe and Central Asia, the Executive Board of Human Rights Watch/Asia, the Board of the Open Society Institute's Central Eurasia Project, the Conseil Scientifique of the Fondation Médecins Sans Frontières, and the Board of the International League for Human Rights. During 1996-98 he served on the Secretary of State's Advisory Committee on Religious Freedom Abroad. Dr. Rubin is the author of Blood on the Doorstep: the Politics of Preventing Violent Conflict (2002). He is also the author, co-author, or editor of The Fragmentation of Afghanistan: State Formation and Collapse in the International System (2002; first edition 1995), Calming the Ferghana Valley: Development and Dialogue in the Heart of Central Asia (1999), Stabilizing Nigeria: Sanctions, Incentives, and Support for Civil Society (1998); Post-Soviet Political Order: Conflict and State Building (1998); Cases and Strategies for Preventive Action (1998); Toward Comprehensive Peace in Southeast Europe: Conflict Prevention in the South Balkans (1996), and The Search for Peace in Afghanistan: From Buffer State to Failed State (1995). Dr. Rubin has written numerous articles and book reviews on conflict prevention, state formation, and human rights in publications including Foreign Affairs, Orbis, Survival, International Affairs, The New York Times, The Washington Post, The New York Review of Books, and elsewhere. He received an MA and PhD from the University of Chicago.

Olivier De Schutter (IPF Group Advisor, Roma Exclusion) is Professor of Human Rights at the Catholic University of Louvain (Belgium) and Global Law Professor at New York University. He is the coordinator of the EU Network of Independent Experts on Fundamental Rights and a Member of the European Group of Legal Experts on Discrimination, previously of the European Group of Experts on Disability Discrimination. He has published extensively on international and human rights, and has litigated a number of cases before the European Court of Human Rights. His most relevant publications in combating disability discrimination in the EU are a book, Discriminations et marché du travail. Liberté et égalité dans les rapports d'emploi (P.I.E. Peter Lang, 2001), which offered a first examination of the promises of the Directives based on Article 13 EC in the field of employment, and a text on "Reasonable Accommodations and Positive Obligations in the European Convention on Human Rights," which shall appear as a chapter of the volume co-edited by C. Gooding and A. Lawson, Disability Rights in Europe (forthcoming, Hart Publ., 2005). He is currently co-editing with G. Quinn Equality and Disability (forthcoming, Bruylant, 2005). He earned an LLM from Harvard University and PhD from Catholic University of Louvain.

Aleksander Smolar (IPF Advisory Board) is President of the Stefan Batory Foundation in Poland. He served as Chief Advisor to Tadeusz Mazowiecki, the first post-communist, democratically elected Prime Minister of Poland, and Foreign Advisor to Prime Minister Hanna Suchocka. He is Senior Researcher at the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique in Paris and the author and editor of books published in Polish, French and English on issues related to democracy, globalization, and civil society in transition contexts. He earned a PhD and MA from Warsaw University in Poland.

Diane Lesley Stone (Founding Head of the CEU Masters of Arts in Public Policy Program) joined the Center for Policy Studies in January 2004, taking a leave of absence from the University of Warwick. She is a recipient of a two-year Marie Curie Chair from the European Commission 6th Framework on Research and Technological Development, which supports her research work on global elites and transnational networks. At the University of Warwick she served as Reader in Politics and International Studies, Principal Research Associate of the Center for the Study of Globalisation and Regionalisation (www.csgr.org) and Senior Fellow, Institute of Governance and Public Administration. She has held a number of teaching and research positions at universities in Europe, Australia and Asia and until January 2005 was sitting on the Governing Body of the Global Development Network, a world-wide association of research institutes concerned with issues of development and transition. In the United Kingdom, she is a Member of Council for the Overseas Development Institute (ODI) and a member of the International Advisory Council, Institute of Commonwealth Studies, University of London. Her most recent book is Global Knowledge Networks and International Development: Bridges Across Borders (co-edited with ODI Director Simon Maxwell, Routledge, 2005). She earned a PhD and MA from Australian National University.

Olena Sydorenko-Szabó (IPF Program Officer) has been affiliated with the Central European University since 1993 (first in Prague and later Budapest) and the Open Society Institute since 1995, when she began researching and writing articles for OSI publications and academic journals on forced migration in the former Soviet Union for the OSI-New York Forced Migration Projects (FMP) office in Prague. She came to Budapest in 1996 to join the Forced Migration Projects Budapest office and has worked with IPF since its establishment in 1998. Olena is currently a PhD candidate in linguistics with the Hungarian Academy of Sciences. She earned an MA from the Central European University.

Kian Tajbakhsh (IPF Group Advisor, Open Society Promotion in Predominantly Muslim Societies) is a social scientist and urban planner based in Tehran, Iran. Since returning to Iran in 2000, he has worked as a consultant in the areas of local government reform, urban planning and social policy, and has taught at several universities. He has worked with several organizations including Iran's Municipalities Organization and the Social Security Organization, and international organizations such as the World Bank and the Dutch Association of Municipalities. His academic research examines the evolving nature of Iranian state institutions. Tajbakhsh is the author of two books and over 20 academic papers. In 2006, he completed a three-year study of the local government sector in Iran. From 1994 until 2001, Tajbakhsh taught urban policy and politics at the New School for Social Research in New York City. He received his MSc from University College, London in 1984, and PhD from Columbia University in 1993.

Vita Terauda (IPF Advisory Board) is Director of Public Policy Center PROVIDUS in Latvia and the former Director of the Soros Foundation in Latvia. Prior to joining the Soros Foundation in 1996, she was Minister of State Reform, holding Cabinet-level responsibility for launching public administration reform. She is a founding member of the local chapter of Transparency International and serves on the boards of a number of non-governmental organizations. She earned an MA from Johns Hopkins University. 

Dmitri Vitaliev (IPF Trainer) joined Front Line over three years ago and has recently served as a security consultant and trainer for a number of Open Society Institute programs. Front Line works for the protection of human rights defenders - people who work non-violently to protect any or all of the rights enshrined in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Front Line aims to address some of the needs identified by defenders themselves, including protection, networking, training and access to the thematic and country mechanisms of the United Nations and other regional bodies. Dmitri works on projects that assist civil society actors with digital security issues. A student of the Information Technology program from Swinburne University, Australia, Dmitri now resides in Ireland where he assists in supporting Front Line's research in the Russian-speaking region and works as their systems administrator.

Vadim Volkov (IPF Group Advisor, Combating Open Society Threats; 2005-6 Group Advisor, Developing Socially Responsible Elites and the Challenges of Higher Education) is Chair of Sociology Department at The Higher School of Economics, St. Petersburg Branch, and Associate Professor of Sociology at the Department of Political Science and Sociology at the European University in St. Petersburg (EUSP). He is currently Marie Curie Fellow of the European Commission at the Institute for Advanced Studies in Berlin. In 1999-2001, he was Social Science Research Council/MacArthur Foundation Postdoctoral Fellow for the International Peace and Security Program. In 1998 he was a visiting professor in history at the University of Chicago. He is the author of Violent Entrepreneurs: The Use of Force in the Making of Russian Capitalism (Cornell University Press, 2002) and articles focusing on social research, politics and society, and Europe-Asia studies. His research interests include economic sociology, problems of state and violence, public and private security, comparative mafia, sociology of everyday life, and politics in cultural contexts. He earned a PhD from the University of Cambridge, UK, and Higher Education Degree from Leningrad State University. 

Eóin Young (IPF Trainer) See the biography of Lisa Quinn and Eóin Young above.

Violetta Zentai (CPS Director; IPF Advisory Board) has been the acting director at the Center for Policy Studies since 2001 and the director since September 2003. In addition to her work at the center, she continues a variety of other related occupations including part-time program manager for the Local Government and Public Service Reform Initiatives with the Open Society Institute in Budapest, tutor at the Budapest University of Economic Sciences and Public Administration and visiting lecturer at Janus Pannonius University, Pécs. Violetta is also Chair of the Board and spokesperson for MONA (Foundation for Women in Hungary) and an editor for Café Bábel, an interdisciplinary critical quarterly in Hungarian. Recently her research projects have focused on democratic governance and decentralization, gender equality, and cultures of capitalism in post-socialist transformations. She earned a PhD from Rutgers University and MA from the Budapest University of Economics.

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