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Dusan Pavlovic

Belgrade, Serbia
2002 - 2005 IPF Fellow


Affiliation: Member of the G17 Institute, Belgrade, Serbia.
e-mail: pavlovic@policy.hu
website: http://www.policy.hu/pavlovic/

Fellow projects

2004 - 2005: Restructuring of enterprises in Serbia
The objectives of the project are to examine the issue of restructuring the privatized Serbian enterprises; conduct a case study of 80 Serbian firms; test the decision to switch from MEBO to a direct sale model of privatization within the Serbian context; develop policy recommendations regarding either amendments within the existing model or an entirely new model of privatization depending on the research results; and write a policy paper for the Ministry of Privatization and the Agency of Privatization in Serbia.

Working groups: Southeast Europe: Conflict Prevention
Relevant countries: Serbia


2002 - 2003: Rational and irrational Serbian public policies
The project goals are to identify the key participants of the public policymaking process in Yugoslavia; explore the environment in which public policies are formulated, adopted and implemented; research whether the policy outcomes match initially established goals and what can be done to improve the policy and decision-making process; conduct instrumental analyses of two distinct policy areas (concerning Kosovo and privatization) and determine the extent to which public policymaking in Serbia's transition period differs from policymaking in the Milosevic era; work out a clear scheme as to how public policies are defined, constructed and introduced into the political agenda in Yugoslavia-Serbia; and write a research and policy paper for the Serbian Ministry for Privatization, the Office of the Deputy Prime Minister of the Serbian government in charge of the Kosovo issue, Serbian professionals, and thegeneral public.

Working groups: Policy Networks and Administrative Reform
Relevant countries: Yugoslavia, Kosovo, Serbia, Montenegro


Fellow's bibliography

Advanced Fellow and Project Finder #2
Open Society Institute creative commons