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Islam Yusufi

Skopje, Macedonia
2002 - 2005 IPF Fellow

promoting open policymaking in Macedonia.

Promoting open policymaking in Macedonia

Following his IPF fellowship investigating security sector reform in Macedonia and Southeast Europe (see www.policy.hu/yusufi and www.policy.hu/policyperspectives), Islam Yusufi helped establish the independent think tank Analytica in Macedonia (www.analyticamk.org).


Affiliation: Founder of Analytica, think tank in Macedonia; formerly Assistant to the National Security Adviser working in the Cabinet of the President of Macedonia.
e-mail: yusufi@policy.hu
website: http://www.policy.hu/yusufi/

Fellow projects

2004 - 2005: Security sector reform in Southeast Europe
The purpose of the project is to examine security sector reform in Southeast Europe; address the impact of the unreformed security sector on governance and security; promulgate concrete and practical recommendations for policymakers; and write a research and policy paper in the field of conflict prevention in Southeast Europe for the governments of Southeast Europe and their security sector agencies such as the army, police, and border guard, as well as for international organizations such as the EU, NATO, OSCE, and UN.

Working groups: Southeast Europe: Conflict Prevention
Relevant countries: Serbia, Macedonia, Kosovo, Bosnia and Herzegovina


2002 - 2003: Security sector reform in Southeast Europe
The objectives of the project are to examine security sector reform and provide a Southeast European perspective regarding such reforms and their role in conflict prevention, devise recommendations for security sector reform in Southeast European countries, and write a research and policy paper on the issue for the Macedonian Government, Army, and Police as well as international organizations including OSCE, UN and NATO.

Working groups: Comparative Studies, Southeast Europe: Conflict Prevention, Building Institutions
Relevant countries: Macedonia, Albania, Serbia, Montenegro


Fellow's bibliography

Open Society Institute creative commons